“Pre-Production” is the new “Post-Production”

There is a singular, terrifying truth that every software developer, application architect, product designer, and stake-holder must eventually embrace. Even if you build the coolest, most useful product in the world, there is a good chance that nobody will use it.

This simple truth evokes dark feelings of inadequacy within the souls of executives and and renders project managers, marketers, and developers useless. It doesn’t matter if your application is robust, scalable, or beautifully designed, you won’t know whether your audience will embrace it until you’ve actually presented it to them.

The problem here is a “known unknown” related to design. Although developers can load test an application to ensure it scales and performs, there hasn’t really been an easy way to test design except in a production environment. Focus groups are about as accurate as licking your thumb and searching for wind direction, and UI/UX consultants can give you beauty, but they can’t guarantee success. So how do you test your user experience before actually presenting your app to users? One of our colleagues wondered the same thing and came up with a pretty nifty solution.

Introducing Apptourage, an easy, cheap way to optimize usability in pre-production. Instead of spending four months developing the perfect app/ERP/CRM/tool, spending tons of cash marketing your new product, and then waiting for useability data to come in, you can upload the user experience and have it tested either by your team or Apptourage’s US-based testers. Easy peasy – Needless to say, we’re big fans of their new tool and recommend it to all of our clients. Check it out here.

Disclaimer: Yes, we have become friendly with the Apptourage crew; but, it’s mostly because we earnestly believe in the product they’ve created.

 

Jira vs. PivotalTracker

Looking for the perfect tool to run your scrum projects? Unfortunately, I don’t have an answer for you. There are many tools out there, however, and each one of them have pros and cons. One thing I can do is go over two of the tools I have used, which hopefully could help you narrow down your search.

Let’s start with pricing. While each of the tools I have used come out to that exact same price for 15, 25, and 50 users, Jira would cost significantly less for up to 10 users. I would like to mention that Jira also offers a cloud version and server version (which, you host yourself). However, with that being said, this comparison is only for the cloud version. The big plus I see here is that with Jira you get the Agile tool,in addition to the bug tracking tool. With PivotalTracker, you only get an Agile tool.

UX. Each have pretty nice UX, but PivotalTracker may be a bit simpler, which could get the user “up-and-running” in less time than Jira. Jira has many more features and if you are trying to learn all of them, then you might just be looking at a few weeks worth of learning.

Customization. They both have customization options. Once again, this could turn into weeks of learning with Jira. Contrarily, PivotalTracker is far more limiting on what can be customized.

Reports. They both offer burndown charts, velocity charts, and historical trends. Jira also offers an estimation chart. While PivotalTracker does not offer estimation charts, I do not find this to be very important. All you need to do is know the total amount of story points, your team velocity, and sprints length to figure out your deadlines.

Task assignment. PivotalTracker offers multiple members assignment, while Jira only allows one user per task. Depending on your workflow, this may be a problem.

Administration effort. Big companies tend to create the roll of Jira administrator. This is one person that deals with Jira 100% of their working hours. This means that if you are working with large scale projects, things can get a bit hairy in Jira.

So what do we take away from all this? I will leave the decision up to you, however I believe that for smaller (strictly scrum tracking) size projects, PivotalTracker may be a better  scrum tool option. For large scale projects (multiple teams or enterprise type situations) Jira may in fact hold the crown.

Here is a quick comparison chart:

Jira vs. PivotalTracker

Jira

PivotalTracker

Web-based
 √  √
Mobil app
   
API
   
Multi-user
 X  
User roles
   X
Notifications
   
Milestone Tracking
 X  √
Gantt Charts
   X
Cost Tracking
   X
Kamban support
   X
Custom Fields
   X

More and More coding careers, less of…..everything else

As students graduate from college with heavy-weighted degrees in the “Liberal Arts”, what they are finding is that in order to make a six figure income, what is becoming increasingly essential, outside of degrees and life experience, is the ability to code. The discouraging factor is that to acquire enough knowledge and experience in coding to land a well paying job, the time commitment and cost are both far less than a four-year degree. Within three months, and $10,000 later, a $100,000 salary can be as close as a stones throw away.

So I pose both an ethical, philosophical, and what seems to be almost a rhetorical question of whether or not it is even considered valuable to go to school for a 4-year degree anymore? To be an academic or scholar, then perhaps yes. However, in that case, you are most likely not in any rush to land a well paying career anytime soon. On the other hand, if college is simply a means to an end to land a decent paying job, perhaps it is time to reconsider.

Don’t get me wrong, not everyone can walk into a coding bootcamp course and come out as a genius engineer. The main trait one has to have before getting into any of this is intelligence. One needs to have a sharp, critical thinking, analytical mind, which college generally provides resources that can help fine-tune this much needed asset. Additionally, apart from simply accomplishing a coding course and receiving a certificate, one also needs to chart a significant amount of hours in front of a computer, geeking out over the artistry and poetic nature of code, if you will.

However, it is undeniable that the tech industry is booming, and their seems to be no end in sight at the moment. It is for this reason that graduates, among others from entirely different fields, are leaving everything they once knew in exchange for the plethora of high salaried paying positions with companies desperate for employees. Although these companies have little quality control, many are not concerned, especially newer start-ups who are backed by wealthy funders encouraging them to hire fast and fire fast if need be. Given the long line of people willing and ready to take the next available position, there is no shortage of competitive candidates. Whether or not this business model is sustainable in the long run, time will only tell.

Nonetheless, with all speculation aside, the tech industry is hands down a lucrative business for many people, all the people, willing and able minded and ready to compute.

Be disciplined

Success and discipline often seem to go hand-in-hand. The general rule of thumb is that through discipline, the road to success will be smoother and more gratifying. Practice and do-diligence are the main ingredients for expertise and an awarding talent; talent generally believed to be a gateway to open up doors to opportunities for a successful, robust career.

Discipline is easy when we are younger, not because we are more capable of moderating ourself, because heaven known that was most likely not the case, but rather because we had someone – be it a parent or a guardian – laying down the law, instilling rules of expectations and providing examples of what it looks like to be dedicated. This teaching was likely provided at a time in our lives when we were predisposed to our parent’s lifestyle choices and dynamics, not given full responsibility, nor consideration, to develop our own schedule or timetable. Not being obligated to enforce discipline on ourselves, we may have been unable to fully grasp how difficult this personality trait can be to cultivate, especially as an adult. As we get older and move into more demanding lifestyles and professions, we loose the luxury of parental stability and structure. Nowadays, you are likely the one enforcing all the discipline, not only on yourself but perhaps too, on an army of other coworkers. Given that professional environments often demand discipline, there is a tendency to objectify the rules of discipline to a point where the very notion of discipline itself no longer retains meaning, damaging willpower and motivation. Although abandoning a discipline practice can be practical for a short period of time in order to return to it with a fresh pair on eyes in the future, loosing it forever can be detrimental.

Maintaining a healthy dose of discipline is the key to a nourishing amount of productivity. Staying interested, engaged, and exploring methods to help become your own personal moderator can prevent stagnancy and inertia in your own self-growth.

Here are 5 useful tips in staying disciplined

  1. Set goals and timelines. Know what the advantage of each of these goals is, and why they need to be completed in a certain timeframe. Understand your own restrictions. Make sure they are useful.
  2. Use both physical and mental effort, one is useless without the other.”Practice what you preach and preach what you practice.”
  3. Eliminate the multitasking and invest in one project/focus at a time. This allows all the necessary details to sink in. Getting curious and interested in just about anything will greatly enhance discipline, yielding more productivity.
  4. Monitor behavior – identify an area you would like to improve in your life, business, or self and then dissect what this means to you. Do a brainstorming session of why it needs work and what “excelling” would actually look like in your book.
  5. Have a positive attitude to failure. Don’t let inevitable misgiving and unavoidable hiccups in the “trial and error” phase erode your personal investment to yourself. Rather than just excepting the old adage “we can learn from our mistakes” truly take this into consideration. See what didn’t work and how you can use those errors as teachers for self-improvement tactics in the future. Discipline is inextricably linked with personal growth.

Discipline is about personal investment and self-worth. The value we often allocate to ourselves can say a lot about our discipline practice. This is not a linear, fixed equation, given that A+B doesn’t only = C (in that, value + discipline doesn’t just equal productivity). Instead A+B=C but C affects A, which also affects B. Therefore, it is protean, ever changing, since the value we give ourselves is forever changing. Keeping this in the back of our minds when working on discipline practices might just help relieve some self-induced pressure when there is a lull in our day.

Big Data. Small Budget. 3 Possible Solutions for an SMB

Big data has revolutionized the way we look at information. Unfortunately, access to the collective set of tools that define this craze is not always easy to come by. Below I lay out three possible ways an SMB can take advantage of the Big Data revolution.

Rent a Cluster
Resource Cost: Potentially High, Labour Cost: So-So, Nerd Props: So-So

If you’re very familiar with the scope of your data crunching project, trust in your team’s ability to write/deploy solid code, and don’t mind spending the extra money on occasion, then maybe a 3rd party computing cluster is for you. Services such as Amazon’s Elastic Map Reduce, Microsoft Azure’s HPC, or Qubole offer you an elastic, on-demand environment to run your code. The benefits are obvious: easy to manage infrastructure, ability to grow/shrink with your data set, ability to grow/shrink with the complexity of your code, and rock-solid performance. The problem with cloud-based computing clusters is that they can (very) easily become expensive. Just moving data around can cost you a few dollars, so make sure your team is able to produce quality code. With that said, we run big data clusters in an Amazon VPC running Spark, and it works very well for our needs.

You Don’t Need a Stinking Cluster
Resource Cost: Low, Labour Cost: Low, Nerd Props: Low

The fact of the matter is, big data is not for everyone. Properly mining data requires a talented team, patience, and a deep understanding of your data. Incomplete data analysis leads to incorrect conclusions. Fortunately, you don’t need access to expensive resources in order to take advantage of the big data revolution. A number of larger enterprises have already done the heavy lifting for you and the results of their analysis are all over the web to review. Websites like Google Trends offer you access to a plethora of information which has been mapped, reduced, analyzed, and made available in lovely chart/graph form. Want to learn more about your particular market segment? A simple Bing or Google search can be your gateway to a world of knowledge. Want to know more about user behavior on Facebook? Just search the web. Chances are, the best work has already been done by researchers at Universities, Think Tanks, and Global Corporations. Just because you’re not mining the data yourself, doesn’t mean it’s not relevant and valuable.

Setup Your Own Cluster
Resource Cost: Low, Labour Cost: High, Nerd Props: High

Modern, open source data crunching platforms are purpose-built to run on all sorts of hardware. Better yet, they’re easy to install and setup. Whereas 15 years ago, the majority of your time would be spent building the actual  computing cluster (i.e. a Beowulf cluster), now, you can focus your efforts on collecting and analyzing your data. Although we’re now a SparkDB shop, in the past, we have implemented Hadoop for crunching data. Both are easy(ish) to get setup. The problem: all distributed computing platforms are only as good as the resources that you throw at them. The name of the game here is “distribution,” so the more nodes (computers) you have, the better. Fortunately, most SMBs have access to a large pool of computing nodes right under their noses. With some basic hardware – gigabit switch, dedicated gigabit Ethernet card, and cables – your unused employee workstations can be run as hadoop nodes in the evening. We recently setup a Spark cluster on three machines and a good time was had by all. The one caveat here is that you will probably want to enable dual boot on these unused machines.

Ideas have a shelf life. Use ’em or lose ’em

How many of us have a list of ideas, dreams, or goals to accomplish? That app to build. That business to start. That book to write. Lists of ideas are helpful because they seemingly are the first stage of initiation, however what happens to those lists when no further action is taken? Like fresh produce, ideas can go bad if left unused. I, too, am guilty of a full compost.

Three years ago, I had an idea. I was out running and then, boom, like lightning something had just appeared in my mind. I wrote it down as soon as I got back to the office. When I say I wrote it down, I mean 10 pages, single spaced, describing all I had in my head about this idea. I was exhausted after capturing it all, but felt good. I closed work for the day feeling great, and told myself, I’ll get to that first thing tomorrow. What do you think happened next?

I had so many details, features, milestones, and plans in my 10 page manifesto, that whenever I returned to reading it, in the back of my head I knew there was no way I could get all this done.

At first glance, I would get excited. I would think of all the ways an idea could happen, and then the phone would ring, leading me to take care of the next problem. (A side effect of running a business in the beginning is that you are very reactive.) Slowly, I started to dread looking at that idea. I began to hide it as a subtask, and then a subtask of a subtask. If that wasn’t damaging enough, I began to feel bad just looking at my task list, causing me to avoid it all together. To make matters worse, this wasn’t the only idea I’ve had. Does this resemble your personal experience?

How did that happen? Something that had brought so much happiness was now causing me to avoid it altogether. I had described it, right? Set my vision, correct? What was missing, and why was I feeling these terrible side effects? The problem was, although I described the outcome, I hadn’t decided to do it, or not do it. Not making this decision can lead to avoiding ideas altogether, resulting in perhaps an even worst fight with our subconscious.

Effects of leaving your ideas on the shelf.

When we leave our ideas on the shelf, without deciding to do them or not, we create an open loop in the back of our mind. Our subconscious picks this up, and reminds us to check in on something. We look at the idea, again don’t make a decision,  which then sends it back to the subconscious to be repeated all over again. It’s a vicious cycle.

Overtime, this behavior can have a mental and physical affect on you.

Bad ideas can literally be detrimental to your health. The best thing you can do is make a decision to:

“Do, or do not. There is no try.” – Yoda to Luke Skywalker. Empire Strikes Back.

If you have been in the habit of writing down your ideas, go through your list and throw away the ones that have gone bad. Ask yourself if you are actually going to do this. If not, throw it away, delete it, and move on. Remember, you can always add them back in later, but only if you have decided you are actually going to do this.

What do you do if you have decided to make it happen? Read on.

Tips to getting your ideas to happen.

I’ve read countless books, and listened to even more podcasts on getting things done. There seems to be a central process to getting an idea off the shelf and into action.

First, if it’s just in your head, write it down.

If you’re like me, and you’ve done this step, no problem. Move on to the next step. Writing it down assures you have something outside of yourself. To repeat, the first step is to write it down. Why is this step so important?  It creates a “thing” and gives it a space outside of yourself and your mind; telling your subconscious, “ok, I got it from here. You can handle something else.” Consider the following prompts if you are having trouble with this initial step.

  • What does your idea look like when complete?
  • What is the final outcome?

Simple but powerful questions get the ball rolling. Do yourself a favor, limit your description to  one page. This helps to share your idea(s) with others. Think about it, when’s the last time you read a 10 page manifesto?

Capture next steps

After you know your outcome and have described your idea, there are two well known strategies to capturing next steps.

  • Work backwards. Think about what the idea looks like in the end. Look at your idea description, write down the stages of getting to that idea from end to start, and arrive at the first step!
  • Start from the beginning, work towards your outcome. What’s something small you could do today? Write down the first steps, tasks, actions you can take today to get started. Something small, and think in terms of, “if I had an hour to move this idea forward, what could I do?” You would be surprised what you can do with an hour. I did this article for example.

One of them should work for you, and if you’re still stuck, let us know in the comment section.

Share your idea and find partners.

It’s simple. Tell someone. I know this goes against the fear of someone stealing your ideas. So don’t just tell anyone. Think about people you trust, who can help you achieve your goals and evolve the idea. Share your idea with these people, and be open to their feedback.

Ideas evolve as they grow. Let your team help your idea become something strong. Your idea might not be what you had originally envisioned when you first thought about it. If you trusted and involved the right people, it can be better. When this starts to feel uncomfortable, remember, if you were able to do this by yourself, it would have been done already. However, it’s not done, because deep down you know you need partners, and help, which is scary because you’re not able to stay fully in control. Cede that control to people you trust, respect, and who you believe can help. Build on that trust with follow-through.

Take action

This has to come from you to make it happen. I’m not saying deep within you, just from you. It’s not going to come from me, or a book, or some conference. It’s going to come from you. You need to get up, and take steps to getting an idea to happen. So stand up, and get going. Take that first step. Share your idea with others. That’s what I thought when I had the idea to write this post.

Ideas evolve. Guide them, and let them evolve.

Ideas can be a source of great happiness. They represent a better tomorrow, and the ability to change the present into something better. But, they can also be a source of anxiety as well, if no decision for action has been made. Sharing your ideas, and taking action on them is one of the keys to a happy life. Bold statement but true.

Share your ideas with the right people. Specifically those who can help your idea evolve into something great. Allow your idea evolve by letting others help you out along the way. Make your idea happen, and help it be the best it can be.

By the way, if you’re curious about what became of that idea I left on the shelf for three years, we started recording this podcast show in January 2015, and we’re about seven episodes in now at the time of this writing, with a growing listener base. All thanks to the power of just getting something done.

If you like this post, we have more in the works. Subscribe to our mailing list today, and we’ll send you an idea builder tool free. Additionally, we’ll send you a collection of our most popular posts from the developers and builders at Rückbau.

 

About the Blogger:

Ja Shia is a marketing and startup consultant based in Oakland. He has started several businesses including Shia Productions, Shia Media Services, and JaShia.com. You can find him on Facebook, LinkedIn, and by throwing a stone at the Internet.

 

How to Increase your Business’s Online Presence

You can choose one of two things; either maximize your profit through engaging in online marketing opportunities, or lose out on a more lucrative future by not participating in boosting your online presence. It is a reality, whether you want to comply or not, that resourcing and utilizing the virtual environment for business marketing has everything to gain. Not only can you enhance your online presence with media and other marketing tools, the internet also plays a vital role in the health of your current, and potential, customer relationships. Here at Rückbau  we acknowledge the importance of a business’s online health. Therefore, we have created a list of top 5 techniques to boost any business’s online presence.

It is all about SEO

All healthy, thriving businesses need an understanding of how to successfully achieve higher rankings through different search engines (i.e. Google, Yahoo). If your website does not show up on the first page of a search when a customer is surfing the web for services that your business excels in, it doesn’t matter how superior your skills are, your services are less likely to be considered, or even found for that matter. Therefore, understanding SEO techniques to contribute to your “search-ability” can play a significant role in bringing traffic to your site.

Pay-per-click (PPC)

Paying for advertisement gives a business more control over who they would like to market their services to, as well as when and where the advertisements are seen. Unlike free online ad options, PPC places a business’s ad in a higher position in sections that are sponsored within a consumer’s search. Pay-per-click is generally more of a temporary solution for marketing to initially increase the SEO value. Having a quality, rockstar landing page, more often then not, will give potential customers more incentive to engage with the business’s website.

Blog and article marketing

By writing articles or blogs that are pertinent to potential customer’s needs, you are able to inform the online community what you do and how your business executes. These articles help to demonstrate the company’s internal voice and how the business operates in their specific area of expertise. To increase this form of media communication with potential audiences, it is best for writers to understand and know the key words that a potential client might use within a search engine when googling services your business offers.

Social Media

Although we all know about social media, not everyone, and every business, are actually taking advantage of them. They are affordable, popular, and can generate a message fast, to an extremely broad audience. More specifically, social media outlets – such as Facebook, Twitter, StumbleUpon – all have huge networks of different target audiences that are excellent for business-to-customer relations. These sites can help a business network more personably, as well as offer a chance to circulate any articles that have been written to be shared with a larger pool of users. Ideally, these articles and other items that are shared, will funnel people back to your website, boosting traffic and helping with the SEO.

More Pages

To increase traffic to your website, it helps to have multiple popular pages that are indexed by Google and additional search engines. Multiple landing pages pertaining to different services a business offers can be helpful, as well as more convenient, for customers who are only seeking a specific service a company offers, rather than needing to scan through the entire site.

Need help with your SEO? Not sure where to start? Contact us at Rückbau for a free one-hour consultation to discuss where you are currently at, and where you would like to see your business go in the future.

What does an IT Consultant do?

IT specialists are generally filling up their days providing services, deploying equipment, fixing hardware and software kinks, and of course coding. However, just because one is a “Specialist” does not make them a “Consultant”. While a specialist might be able to work at length on one project or assignment until feeling sufficiently complete, a consultant has to be more agile in juggling clients and challenges. Below are 5 services and characteristics that are specific to an IT Consultant.

Multitaskers:

-As mentioned above, just because one is an IT expert does not necessarily mean they are an IT consultant. Consultants are constantly multitasking – whether they like it or not. They have the ability to manage, and balance, multiple accounts all at one time, with different business models and various demands. They deal with more variables, and therefore require a more adaptable disposition than an IT pro. Consultants are flexible with both scheduling and curve balls.

Versatility:

-IT Consultants are extremely versatile with hardware and software technologies, never just wanting to pigeonhole themselves into one specialty. They also have an extensive coding language arsenal, to be able to provide expertise for any customer that comes along. Why? Because specialization is for the birds.

Salesman/ Businessman

-Customers and potential customers generally are in the dark in regards to what it means to “leverage their technology” or how that could benefit their business in the long run. They don’t usually care to dish out very much extra money on more advanced network technologies, hardware or software if their understanding of such tech is minimal. Therefore, it is an IT consultant’s responsibility to use their expertise, knowledge and wit to help novices understand how such services could payoff for them in the long-run. Providing a timeline of a payment plan while paralleling that with the services that will be offered concurrently, can be extremely helpful for an IT consultants’ showmanship.

Resiliency

-The ability to be resilient in key. Many deal with very demanding client expectations. The expectations generally don’t come from a place of “knowing” but rather a lack of knowledge with tech. In fact, many clients are demanding out of frustration because they actually are unsure of what they are even asking from the consultant. Therefore, consultants must practice resiliency as they get plenty of flack from customers who are making irrational requests for immediacy. Due to the convenience culture technology has helped perpetuate, IT consultants generally have to endure many demands on a tight schedule, all with a smile.

IT Handyman/ Technology Therapist

-Advising clients of more efficient ways to use information technology is preliminary for this type of work. However, most IT consultants know that their job title includes/ demands much more than just this alone. Their tasks involve a wide range of things – they not only need to know tech, but they also need to have a clear understanding of how the tech is being used in the company for which it is needed. Having an extensive understanding of workflows and coding language is invaluable and, at the heart of it, mandatory. IT consultants have to study the existing IT infrastructure of a company the same way an architect would study a building. Similarly, they also need to be well informed of the company culture, something akin to that of an anthropologist. Consultants are multifaceted problem-solvers, offering advice and consoling, never giving generic solutions. This is not a “one-size-fits-all” type of job.

Android’s Future in the World of Mobile Devices

Albeit the booming sales of Androids over the past year – being the top player in mobile device sales by selling over a billion phones in 2014 alone, nearly five times that of iphones – there are still some challenges that Google faces with Android. As Apple’s mobile device popularity continues to grow at an unprecedented rate, there are some known facts that Google is beginning to face. Over the years, many people have used Android for it’s affordability over Apple. In general, this has, demographically, represented Android users as less financially well-off than Apple users. As a result, Android users have invested less money overall in Google Play – Androids’ app store. The sales generated from phone devices alone is meager in comparison to the revenue made from apps. The issue for Google is that although Google Play has become increasingly popular in past years, Apple continues to generate more from it’s app store – about $4 billion more than Google Play.

Given that a majority of revenue of mobile devices come from apps, Google has suffered significantly, specifically from China’s focus being primarily on iOS platforms, which has resulted in the country essentially blocking Google app sales. On top of that, Google has had a difficult time generating money from ads on Android. Being an ad company that owns most of the popular internet, one would think the company would favor their own product over Apple advertisements. However, it has inadvertently been quite the contrary. Instead, a recent analysis by Goldman Sachs found that 75% of the $11.8 billion Google collected on mobile search ads came strictly from iphone or ipad advertisements.

With the growing popularity of Apple devices and the steady interest in iOS application development, specifically in Silicon Valley, Google is struggling to keep Android as a first choice among consumers. In addition, it seems that those that are not invested in Apple devices are looking for alternatives, as many are not wanting to support Google. Since Google has colonized much of the tech world – yet is ceasing to be a dominate player in the mobile device market – other companies, specifically smaller players, are using this as leverage to market their apps and new forms of interface to different companies, in effort to keep money within their own “ecosystem”.

Google is now reconsidering it’s priorities. Initially Android was used as a smartphone platform to get users to more easily access Google. The founders claimed they weren’t originally necessarily interested in phone sales. However, now that they have seen the direction the future is going, and the future seems to be lying in the palms of our hands, Google is reassessing how to compete with their competitors, and if that is even something they are interested in doing. It seems that Androids, being a more affordable smartphone device for so long, had become known as a “gateway” for phone users. As mobile device users become more savvy and intelligent , Google is finding their customers to not be so loyal as a mass migration has taken place from Android, straight into the bosom of Apple. Maybe it’s Apple’s sleek advertisements or their disciples’ cunning proselytizing, either way, users are converting. This past year alone, 16% of iphone purchasers were previously Android users

It seems that Google needs to more clearly delineate their intentions with Android. Considering Google is such a major force of power that has monopolized the internet to a point where the word “google” has now become a verb, there is some curiosity of whether now Google wants be more altruistic, offering Android as an affordable product to the middle class, and not simply cater to the successful, ambitious tech oligopoly. Or does Google have no such plans to remain the underdog for long. Time will only tell, but something tells me that Google is not interested in supporting the proletariate in the long run.

Top 10 Signs That You’ve Hired the Wrong Developer

1- “Yes, I program Java. I use the Angular.” Uh oh… Run for the hills, this person is not a developer. You should be impressed that s/he was able to send you an email.

2- “I’m a full-stack engineer.” This one is tricky. Lots of people out there claim to be full-stack engineers, when in reality they only have some superficial knowledge of just a few things. A real full-stack engineer should be able to go from A to Z with deep knowledge about the front-end, the middle logic and the backend (including the data layer).

3- “I’m strictly a Rails developer.” I don’t think this one needs any further explanation as to why not to hire this person. So how do you identify this person? Easy, all they know is Ruby on Rails.

4- “The programming language that I know is the right tool for every job.” Different jobs require different tools. It is ok if your Dev doesn’t know every language out there, but it is not ok when they try to force and convince you that the only thing they know is the right tool for the job.

5- “I took a handful of CS classes at a very good university.” A good education is always a great plus, but it shouldn’t be all they are basing their experience on when attempting to be hired. Experience should be the most important badge. Some of the best programmers I know barely made it through high school (because all their time was devoted to programming at home).

6- “I’m an expert in jQuery, but I’ve never programmed in Javascript.” Yikes! jQuery is a JavaScript library! They may not look the same, but if you claim to be an expert in jQuery, you should also know JavaScript.

7. “What’s a Repo?” It’s that thing that’s going to save the thing you’re sitting on. Don’t ever let anyone mess with your code if they have no clue what a Repo is!

8. “What’s a data structure?” We are a data heavy company, so understanding how data is encapsulated in objects is extremely important.

9. “I’m known as a rebel amongst my colleagues. I get things done my own way.” There is no single right way to solve a problem, but there are countless wrong ways. Most times, programmers that take their own road, haven’t done the due diligence to find one of the many right roads.

10. “I always use these 12 frameworks when writing code.” Frameworks and libraries are nice and save us time, but a good developer needs to understand the basic inner workings of a language – How is memory managed? Which functions have heavy loads? etc. Frameworks obfuscate much of this information which can result in dangerous practices, especially when you’re trying to scale.